MOSS Book Club

The MOSS Book Club was created to join adult community members with a love for natural history and a love for reading!

Participation is free and open. Join us on the second Wednesday of each month during the school year (except December) at the MOSS offices from 6-7:15 pm for intriguing conversation over natural history literature.

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Book Descriptions

September 11th - The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wulf

"The Invention of Nature" reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how hecreated the way we understand nature today. Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life.

October 9th - Anthill by E.O. Wilson

Edward O. Wilson has studied a lot of weird creatures, from Congo eels to stinking cedars, Desmognathus salamanders to dogface butterflies. So it’s fitting that the venerable biologist’s first novel is itself a bizarre hybrid. “Anthill” sets out to be a coming-of-age tale, but at a deeper level it’s the story of its author’s frustration with the unknowable human heart.

November 13th - The Immense Journey by Loren Eiseley

In an unusual blend of scientific knowledge and imaginative vision, Loren Eiseley tells the story of man. Anthropologist and naturalist, Dr. Eiseley reveals life's endless mysteries in his own experiences, departing from their immediacy into meditations on the long past, wandering—intimate with nature—along the paths and byways of time, and then returning to the present.

January 8th - The Tangled Tree by David Quammen

Nonpareil science writer David Quammen explains how recent discoveries in molecular biology can change our understanding of evolution and life’s history, with powerful implications for human health and even our own human nature.

February 19th - The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson (special date to join Sacagawea Audubon’s Book Club)

Strange niches of history. Obsessives who refuse to adhere to the law. A writer who stumbles upon a story that becomes an obsession in its own right. All these elements combust to create Johnson's investigation into the theft of 299 rare bird skins from a British natural history museum. While bird skins might sound like (ahem) dry reading, Johnson knows just how to fascinate the reader, plunging with vigor into exotic bird exploration, the crackdown on rare bird trafficking, and the insular world of fly-tying enthusiasts, all of which lead, almost inevitably, to the theft from the Tring Museum.

Book List & Dates

  • September 11th - The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wulf

  • October 9th - Anthill by E.O. Wilson

  • November 13th - The Immense Journey by Loren Eiseley

  • December - No Meeting

  • January 8th - The Tangled Tree by David Quammen

  • February 19th - The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson (different time & location TBD to join the Sacagawea Audubon Book Club Discussion)

  • March 11th - Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape by Lauret Savoy

  • April 8th - Grizzly Years by Doug Peacock

  • May 13th - Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer


 

March 11th - Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape by Lauret Savoy

Sand and stone are Earth’s fragmented memory. Each of us, too, is a landscape inscribed by memory and loss. One life-defining lesson Lauret Savoy learned as a young girl was this: the American land did not hate. As an educator and Earth historian, she has tracked the continent’s past from the relics of deep time; but the paths of ancestors toward her—paths of free and enslaved Africans, colonists from Europe, and peoples indigenous to this land—lie largely eroded and lost.

April 8th - Grizzly Years by Doug Peacock

For nearly twenty years, alone and unarmed, author Doug Peacock traversed the rugged mountains of Montana and Wyoming tracking the magnificent grizzly. His thrilling narrative takes us into the bear's habitat, where we observe directly this majestic animal's behavior, from hunting strategies, mating patterns, and denning habits to social hierarchy and methods of communication. As Peacock tracks the bears, his story turns into a thrilling narrative about the breaking down of suspicion between man and beast in the wild.

May 13th - Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together.